Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office

  • Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA

Vision
The vision of the Human Resources Office is that all military and civilian customers find value in our services and products, and regard the HRO staff as highly competent and responsive to their human resources needs.

Mission
The mission of Human Resources Office is for all team members to provide the best possible service and solutions to customers on civilian personnel programs and situations in a prompt, supportive and professional manner.

Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Miramar, San Diego, CA, USA
Feb 12, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  MAINTENANCE WORKER, GRADE 7  General: The grade 7 maintenance worker performs a variety of tasks involved in the upkeep of buildings, grounds, and related structures, fixtures and utilities.  Typical work assignments include the performance of visual examinations and operational tests to determine the need for, and the performance of, repair work on a level of difficulty and responsibility of trades such as those described in job grading standards for the kinds and levels of work shown in the following examples. (Examples of similar jobs that are assigned to other occupations are also shown.)  MAINTENANCE WORKER, GRADE 8 General: The grade 8 maintenance worker performs a variety of tasks involved in the upkeep of buildings, grounds, and related structures, fixtures, and utilities. Typical work assignments include the performance of visual examinations and operational tests to determine the need for, and the performance of, repair work on a level of difficulty and responsibility of trades such as those described in job grading standards for the kinds and levels of work shown in the following examples. (Examples of similar jobs that are assigned to other occupations are also shown.) MAINTENANCE MECHANIC, GRADE 9  General:  The grade 9 maintenance mechanic performs a variety of tasks involved in the upkeep of buildings, grounds and related structures, fixtures, and utilities.  Typical work assignments include the visual examinations and operational tests to determine the need for, and the performance of, repair work on a level of difficulty and responsibility of trades such as those described in job grading standards for the kinds and levels of work shown in the following examples.  (Examples of similar jobs that are assigned to other occupations are also shown.) MAINTENANCE MECHANIC, GRADE 10  General:  The grade 10 maintenance mechanic performs a variety of tasks involved in the upkeep of buildings, grounds, and related structures, fixtures, and utilities.  Typical work assignments include the performance of visual examinations and operational tests to determine the need for, and the performance of, repair work on a level of difficulty and responsibility of trades such as those described in job grading standards for the kinds and levels of work shown in the following examples.  (Examples of similar jobs that are assigned to other occupations are also shown.)   Lloyd Songne Team D  
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Miramar, San Diego, CA, USA
Feb 12, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  Supply clerks and technicians perform work in a wide range of systematized supply operations, such as performing records functions in inventory, storage, cataloging, and receipt and control processes.  Employees typically do work associated with one of the supply management or operations processes.  Some employees, however, do work at local installations involving elements of several supply programs.  Supply clerks and technicians perform one o r more of the following kinds of work: oversee stock maintenance at or within prescribed levels and establish or adjust stock levels and reorder points using standard formulae and prescribed procedures;  conduct physical inventories and adjust and/or maintain inventory, stock, plant, or property account records; receive and screen lists or other documents specifying supplies or materials needed for planned programs or work operations, and collate and assemble lists of equipment and parts needed for acquisition plans; initiate, prepare, edit, and process requisitions to stock, commodity control, or other appropriate supply organizations; search catalogs, records, or other data sources to obtain or correct stock numbers or to find authorized substitutes for stock items; contact customers, supply organizations, transportation units, and others to obtain material status information, follow up on urgently required items, and/or expedite delivery of material to work sites; process documentation for stock item receipts, maintain such items in a supply room or similar storage area, issue material to shop or work center personnel, keep local stock records, reorder when stocks are low or at a specified reorder point, prepare standard reports such as variances between actual and estimated costs, and perform related stock receipt, storage, control, and issue functions for expendable and non-expendable items for a local organization; identify requirements and requisition, issue, or distribute office and administrative supplies, forms, publications, or other printed materials; maintain an accurate accounting and reporting system for non-expendable property and perform standardized property management control processes; and/or operate computer terminals or personal computers to perform records search, data input, and data corrections. A supply "item" as used in this standard is a generic term. It may refer to supplies, equipment, material, property (except real property), publications, and certain related services. Scope or size of the organization served does not itself influence the grade level of Supply Clerk or Technician positions. They operate in any kind of organizational entity, at any level. They may be found, for example, in an operating office serving the consumer, in an agency headquarters supply office, in the supply office of a local field establishment, or in a system-wide national inventory control point. Virtually all supply systems are automated. Supply clerks and technicians must have sufficient knowledge of the automated systems to apply instructions for supply actions such as data entry, reports retrieval, error correction, and searching for specific records. The work is performed through terminal stations and/or personal computers. Employees maintain specified sets of records in general supply operations or in support of one of the specialized supply functions (i.e., inventory, cataloging, etc.) and are responsible for keeping them both accurate and current.    Lloyd Songne Team D  
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 12, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  GS-2210: Information Technology Management Series Note: The Information Technology Management Series, GS-2210, has replaced the GS-334, Computer Specialist Series. This standard covers GS-2210 positions and any remaining GS-334 positions. The text below is extracted verbatim from Section IV-B of the Operating Manual for Qualification Standards for General Schedule Positions (p.IV-B-p50), but contains minor edits to conform to web-page requirements. Individual Occupational Requirements Note: Applicants may meet the minimum qualification requirements for GS-5 and GS-7 positions in this series in two ways. These are described below as Alternatives A and B. These alternatives are designed to allow eligibility either through demonstrating prior computer-related education or experience (A) or demonstrating general analytical ability through other kinds of education or experience and passing a written test (B). Applicants who qualify on the basis of Alternative B must take a written test for competitive appointment at the applicable grade levels. The written test is not required by OPM for inservice placement. There is no written test for applicants who qualify on the basis of Alternative A. Education Undergraduate and Graduation Education Alternative A (for GS-5 through GS-11) : Major study--computer science, information science, information systems management, mathematics, statistics, operations research, or engineering, or course work that required the development or adaptation of computer programs and systems and provided knowledge equivalent to a major in the computer field. Alternative B (for GS-5 and GS-7 only) : Major study--any field. OR Experience General Experience (for GS-5 positions) Alternative A:  Experience that provided a basic knowledge of data processing functions and general management principles that enabled the applicant to understand the stages required to automate a work process. Experience may have been gained in work such as computer operator or assistant, computer sales representative, program analyst, or other positions that required the use or adaptation of computer programs and systems. Alternative B: Meet general experience requirements in the "Group Coverage Qualification Standard for Administrative and Management Positions". Specialized Experience (for positions above GS-5) For GS-7: Experience in the performance of tasks such as: Translating detailed logical steps developed by others into language codes that computers accept where this required understanding of procedures and limitations appropriate to use of a programming language. Interviewing subject-matter personnel to get facts regarding work processes, and synthesizing the resulting data into charts showing information flow. Operating computer consoles where this involved choosing from among various procedures in responding to machine commands or unscheduled halts. Scheduling the sequence of programs to be processed by computers where alternatives had to be weighed with a view to production efficiency. Preparing documentation on cost/benefit studies where this involved summarizing the material and organizing it in a logical fashion. Such skills are typically gained in the computer field or through performance of work where the primary concern was the subject matter of the computer application (e.g., supply, personnel, chemical process control), and computer-related efforts were required to facilitate the basic duties. Also, work in management analysis, program analysis, or a comparable field may have provided such skills. (Such experience may also have been obtained by applicants for GS-9 and GS-11 positions in this field.) For GS-9: Experience that demonstrated knowledge of computer requirements and techniques in carrying out project assignments consisting of several related tasks, such as typically is the case in development of minor modifications to parts of a system on the basis of detailed specifications provided. The assignments must have shown completion of the following, or the equivalent: Analysis of the interrelationships of pertinent components of the system; Planning the sequence of actions necessary to accomplish the assignment; and Personal responsibility for at least a segment of the overall project. For GS-11: Experience that demonstrated accomplishment of computer project assignments that required a range of knowledge of computer requirements and techniques. For example, assignments would show, on the basis of general design criteria provided, experience in developing modifications to parts of a system that required significant revisions in the logic or techniques used in the original development. Accomplishments, in addition to those noted for the GS-9 level, normally involve the following, or the equivalent: Knowledge of the customary approaches, techniques, and requirements appropriate to an assigned computer applications area or computer specialty area in an organization; Planning the sequence of actions necessary to accomplish the assignment where this entailed coordination with others outside the organizational unit and development of project controls; and Adaptation of guidelines or precedents to the needs of the assignment. For GS-12 and above: Experience that demonstrated accomplishment of computer project assignments that required a wide range of knowledge of computer requirements and techniques pertinent to the position to be filled. This knowledge is generally demonstrated by assignments where the applicant analyzed a number of alternative approaches in the process of advising management concerning major aspects of ADP system design, such as what system interrelationships must be considered, or what operating mode, system software, and/or equipment configuration is most appropriate for a given project.   Lloyd Songne TeamD
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 12, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  Secretaries perform numerous tasks which are dissimilar in kind, but which have in common the purpose of assisting the work of one or more persons in an organization. Because all of the individual tasks performed by secretaries are related to the work of the people they assist, there are unique opportunities available for secretaries to increase the scope of their position. That is, by using information and insight obtained in performing one task, secretaries can enlarge scope and effectiveness of their performance of others. There is also a special opportunity for secretaries and the people they support to build a mutual working relationship which results in a secretary's acting and speaking for these individuals with an authority not common in other clerical positions. The duties of a secretary are in some respects similar to those found in many of the specialized clerical series. Nevertheless, the value of these duties frequently cannot be evaluated by reference to the standards for the individual clerical series because the tasks, as performed by the secretary, are part of a broader and more inclusive responsibility which requires that the secretary be aware of virtually everything happening in the entire organization.  The typical secretarial position requires a general knowledge of substantive work of the organization under the jurisdiction of the persons assisted and, as the secretary's participation in the management of the organization increases and as the nature and extent of that management effort increases through differences in the work situation, the amount of knowledge required increases accordingly.  Positions at the lower grades consist primarily of clerical and procedural duties and, as positions increase in grade, administrative support functions are more predominant.  At the higher levels, the secretary applies a very considerable knowledge of the organization, its objectives, and lines of communication.  Typical clerical and procedural duties of positions in this series include:  providing telephone and receptionist services; maintaining records of leave and attendance; requisitioning office supplies, repairs on office equipment, and printing services; reserving rooms for meetings; filing material and maintaining office filing systems; receiving and controlling incoming correspondence; reviewing outgoing correspondence, reports, etc., for format, grammar, and punctuation, and removing typographical errors; writing simple or repetitive, non-technical correspondence such as letters of acknowledgment in accordance with a given format; performing typing, stenographic, or transcribing duties; keeping abreast of various procedural requirements, for example, procedures required to process travel vouchers; maintaining information needed for budget purposes. Administrative support duties typically provided by secretaries include:  making extensive travel arrangements; making complete arrangements for large conferences; composing complex, but non-technical correspondence; locating and assembling information for various reports, briefings, conferences, etc.; following up with staff members to insure that various commitments made at conferences and meetings are met; designing and organizing filing systems; planning and arranging the maintenance and preparation of information needed for budget reports; organizing the flow of clerical processes in the office and in subordinate offices. These are only examples of work performed in this series. For a position to be included in this series, it is not necessary for it to include typing, stenography, or any other single duty. Positions in this series involve the performance and coordination of various duties, rather than performance of any one duty such as the preparation of a particular report or the processing of a particular kind of document. The nature and extent of assistance provided by the secretary varies. There may be instances where the unit consists of one employee doing substantive work with the secretary working only for that one employee. In some organizations the secretary primarily assists the supervisor of the organization while providing limited assistance to members of the supervisor's staff. In other situations, positions may involve significant assistance to several staff members, usually the senior members in an organization, in addition to the supervisor. In organizations with a small staff, the secretary may assist all members. Because the nature of the work in this series involves, in varying degrees, all of the administrative and clerical functions of an office, secretaries provide some amount of assistance to everyone in the organization served. However, in all such cases the secretary serves as the principal clerk or administrative assistant to the head of the organizational unit. Therefore, there typically is no more than one secretary role possible in each organizational unit. The most common exception, of course, is where both a chief and a deputy each might have a bona-fide secretary position. Finally, it should be noted that a sole clerk is not necessarily a secretary; there must be a comprehensive range of clerical or administrative support duties to be performed. Work assigned to secretary positions may range from very routine and procedural duties, such as providing receptionist, phone, and typing services, to very responsible work, such as developing information for use in large, complex, and critical conferences. Generally, a secretary can provide assistance in the more procedural aspects of general office work for several staff members without difficulty. There is no hard, fast rule as to the number of people a secretary can serve. However, the number of people to whom a secretary can provide higher level, more responsible assistance, is limited because of the demands such duties place on the secretary in terms of awareness of the activities, views, programs, and commitments of the person assisted. It is also unreasonable to expect a secretary to provide clerical support, e.g., typing, to a large number of people and at the same time provide higher level administrative support. The presence of high volume, routine business will almost invariably preclude performance of the higher level work.  Click here for additional job information, and skills and experience requirements   Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 12, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  Purchasing agents use a variety of purchasing procedures to acquire supplies, services, and construction.  In this standard, "purchasing" refers to (a) open market procedures used to purchase requirements within small purchase dollar limitations, and/or (b) procedures used to place delivery orders against established contracts, such as Federal Supply Schedules and requirements contracts.  For the purpose of position classification, the terms "open market" and "small purchase" are used interchangeably.  Purchasing work is governed by acquisition laws and regulations, such as the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act (FPASA) and the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR).  These are supplemented by additional regulations, legal precedents, and agency policies and procedures.  Purchasing agents acquire supplies and services to meet the needs of agencies or activities. These needs include common supplies available off-the-shelf, items that are manufactured to order, specialized services, or construction. Purchasing agents determine the appropriate procedures to use to obtain goods and services that will fill the requirements, meet the delivery schedule, provide the best price, and conform to acquisition regulations. Purchases made usually involve short performance periods (less than a year). Suppliers may be local or nonlocal retailers, distributors, wholesalers, or manufacturers. During the purchasing process the purchasing agent remains in contact with the ordering office and/or with technical and supply personnel to discuss quotes that differ from the original order. Differences may involve substitution of items, delay in delivery dates, or increases in price. Purchasing agents keep informed of available goods and services by checking commercial catalogs, contact files, and listings of firms offering particular goods, and through informal contacts with sales representatives, suppliers, and buyers from other Federal activities. They are expected to have sufficient knowledge of the market to advise requisitioners on products available, sources, prices, and vendor reputation. Steps in the Purchasing Process  The basic purpose of a purchasing office is to provide support to customers by obtaining the goods and services requested. Customers or others are responsible for determining what is needed, i.e., the requirements. Purchasing agents determine how the requirement will be purchased and advise customers on the status of the purchase. Purchasing agents typically act upon many purchase requests each day. The requests usually include detailed descriptive information, such as the item name, part number, detailed specifications, latest known price, and a suggested vendor. Service and construction requests often include a statement of work. Using Federal and agency guidelines, the purchasing agent first screens the purchase request for completeness and adequacy and to determine how the purchase should be made. Some factors considered are-- does the purchase request contain certification of funds, prior authorizations or approvals, required justifications, or other documentation; can separate purchase requests be consolidated; what labor laws or other social legislation apply; is there a required source (e.g., Federal Supply Schedule) for the supply or service; what is the dollar value of the requested goods; is competition available or required; is the item or service commercial or specialized; what is the best way to locate sources; and how urgent is the requirement. The purchasing agent determines whether to meet the requirement by either ordering against an existing contract (e.g., Federal Supply Schedules) or through open market/small purchase procedures.  If the decision is to order against an established contract, the purchasing agent prepares a delivery order, or orders orally or by written telecommunication.  If the decision is to use an open market procedure, the purchasing agent then determines-- the extent of competition; the specific firm or firms to whom the work will be offered; the method of solicitation (e.g., orally or by means of a written RFQ); the method of purchasing (e.g., calls against a blanket purchase agreement, issuance of a purchase order, over-the-counter imprest fund or credit card transaction, etc.); and the terms and conditions of the purchase. Before making a purchase, the purchasing agent evaluates responsiveness of the quotes and vendor responsibility, reviews quotes for price reasonableness, and determines if the requirements for competition have been met. For service or construction purchases, the purchasing agent may have to arrange for and attend technical review committees, pre-award conferences and walk-throughs, and serve as the employing organization's business representative during these sessions. Note: Orders placed under established contracts, such as Federal Supply Schedules (FSS), may not require solicitation of sources, selection of clauses or provisions, determinations of price reasonableness, or vendor responsiveness and responsibility. For these orders, specific terms and conditions usually have been established and agreed upon between the Government and the vendor(s) involved. Some supply, service, or construction orders also require substantial responsibility for administration and oversight. This may include responsibility for representing the employing organization in post award meetings or discussions with contractors to obtain agreement on significant or ongoing changes in small purchases, encourage contractor compliance, or terminate the order. More typical, however, is post award administration involving delays in delivery and minor non-conformance in quantity or product. This usually results in the purchasing agent acting as a liaison between the vendor and the using party to negotiate minor price considerations, changes in terms of delivery, cancellations of orders, etc. Click here for additional job duties, and the required experiences, education and skills   Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 12, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  Organization of Transportation Support Work The objective of most transportation support work is to obtain the most efficient transportation services at the least cost. Transportation support work is typically organized by specific functional areas. Functional specialties include, for example, freight, passenger, personal property, and fleet management. Freight shipment work involves duties such as--  securing carriers to arrange for pickup, delivery, and storage of shipments; identifying the mode or combination of modes, types of special equipment, and services required for shipments; and advising customers of inadequacies or inaccuracies in shipping requests and related documentation. Passenger travel work involves duties such as-- providing information on air, bus, and/or rail schedules and fares; ensuring tickets, rental car reservations, and itineraries issued by the contract travel service office correspond with travel authorized; lanning itineraries and arranging for commercial, Government-owned, or contracted travel;  ensuring the lowest contract fare is obtained or exceptions are authorized; determining, verifying, or explaining entitlements related to househunting trips, temporary quarters, administrative leave, transportation of dependents, reimbursement of expenses, car rentals, baggage allowances, stops enroute, emergency travel, etc.; and checking in passengers at Government air terminals to include reviewing travel documents, preparing boarding pass tickets, weighing and tagging baggage, completing cash transactions, and providing a variety of information to passengers related to flight arrivals and departures, fares, flight itineraries, border clearance requirements, seat availability, etc. Personal property shipment work involves duties such as--  determining and advising on entitlements or procedures related to, for example, temporary storage of goods, weight allowances, prohibited items, and shipment of unaccompanied baggage, privately owned vehicles, and household goods; preparing cost estimates to assist the customer in determining the best method of movement (e.g., Government, commuted rate, or "do-it-yourself"); selecting carriers and arranging for the pickup, delivery, and storage of personal property; and establishing and maintaining records of all lots in storage, determining if lots exceed weight allowances, and arranging for the removal or relocation of items. Fleet management involves the management of Government-owned or leased passenger cars, trucks, or special purpose vehicles.  It includes duties such as--  reviewing, recording, or compiling information related to vehicle assignment and use, income, mileage reports, preventive maintenance services, accidents, billing, or other program data; developing and maintaining accident case files; developing rental rates to cover operating costs; conducting or assisting in inspections or investigations of assigned vehicles; and ensuring optimum vehicle availability and use by rotating or reassigning vehicles between sections/units/centers. Among other responsibilities, the following tasks are common to many transportation clerk and assistant functions:  preparing and issuing paperwork to initiate, document, or complete transportation actions; responding to customer complaints or problems involving delays, loss, or damage;  reconciling and certifying bills related to transportation actions; analyzing, reviewing, and preparing reports or correcting computerized error listings; and  conducting performance reviews and quality inspections of services provided under contract. The four specialty areas, i.e., freight, passenger, personal property, and fleet management, represent the predominant work performed by transportation clerks and assistants in the Federal Government.  Some transportation clerks and assistants work in other functional specialty areas such as transportation safety and regulatory programs.  Transportation clerks and assistants who work in an automated environment must have sufficient knowledge of automated systems to apply instructions for transportation actions such as data entry, information or reports retrieval, error correction, and record searches. The work is performed through terminal stations and/or personal computers. Some employees also maintain specific files or records in support of transportation operations and are responsible for keeping them current. Other employees, because of their extensive experience in a transportation support function, assist in the automation of clerical processes by providing subject-matter input and review. Using an automated transportation system, rather than a manual one, requires a different orientation to creating, acquiring, or processing information. In some cases, its use requires continual training due to constant changes in program capabilities. This, however, does not exclude a position from coverage by this series when the work involves a primary knowledge of transportation procedures, programs, and rules. The use of automated transportation systems to do transportation support work is addressed in the factor levels in this standard. Use of an automated system, by itself, does not normally affect the grade of transportation support positions. Rather, the primary influences are typically the subject matter knowledge of the kinds of information available in the system and the way that information is used. Click here for additional information related to required skills & experience   Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 12, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  General: The work at this grade involves servicing a wide variety of heavy mobile equipment such as tanks, cranes, tractors, road graders, and loaders. Skill and Knowledge:  Mobile equipment servicers must be able to read and use blueprints and technical publications.  They are required to have a thorough knowledge of the characteristics and use of various lubricants, cooling system protective agents, and hydraulic compounds.  Grade 6 mobile equipment servicers drain moisture from air tanks, install alcohol in air systems, change oil and filters on hydraulic systems which operate hoists and tailgates, service fifth wheel on tractors or mechanisms for locking and holding tractors, and repair all sizes of tires.  They must have basic operating knowledge of all equipment serviced in order to test them for proper operation.  They also perform lubricating and other services on heavy mobile equipment in the field from lubrication field service vehicles equipped with an air compressor, reels, hoses, pumps, and guns.  They perform preventive maintenance on these field service vehicles and its equipment.  Responsibility:  Work is assigned similar to that at grade 5.  At this level, mobile equipment servicers determine the proper lubricant or solvent mixtures to use, the proper tools and equipment to use, and the work methods to follow.  The work, especially that performed in the field, is not usually checked while in progress. Physical Effort:  Mobile equipment servicers frequently stand, walk and handle objects weighing up to 7 kilograms (15 pounds). Occasionally heavy lifting is required at this grade such as handling cans and drums or petroleum products weighing up to 18 kilograms (40 pounds). Additionally, Grade 5 mobile equipment servicers frequently bend, reach, and work in awkward positions when performing work in lube pits or from car racks.    However, at the grade 6 level, mobile equipment servicers frequently work on top of equipment at heights up to 6 meters (18 feet)  above ground and underneath vehicles by use of a creeper, and occasionally lift and carry objects weighing up to 23 kilograms (50 pounds).   Working Conditions:  The work is performed outside in all kinds of weather.  There is frequent exposure to cuts and burns.  It is generally done inside in areas that are dirty, oily, greasy, and there is constant exposure to minor cuts, bruises, and burns. Much of the work at this level, however, is performed outside in various weather conditions.    Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 12, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  General: Drivers at this grade level operate one or more motor vehicles including platform trucks, van trucks, fuel trucks, stake trucks, dump trucks, and trash removal trucks which typically have an approximate gross vehicle weight of more than 11,700 kilograms (26,000 pounds) and up to 14,400 kilograms (32,000 pounds). Also, at this grade level drivers may operate passenger buses or passenger ambulance buses regardless of gross vehicle weight. All of these vehicles are usually equipped with air brakes. Vehicles are driven on the basis of either specific trip assignments or regularly established schedules over public roads (or the equivalent) at highway speeds to transport passengers, patients, supplies, materials, or equipment and tools or to tow equipment throughout rural or urban areas. Drivers perform operator maintenance on all vehicles operated (e.g., monitoring fluid levels, replacing air filters and interior lights, checking tire pressure and hose connections, and washing the vehicle). Drivers at this grade may operate platform, van, stake, and dump trucks in the same manner as described at the grade 6 level except that these vehicles are higher, wider, longer, and heavier than those driven at the lower grade level, and carry bulkier and heavier loads which are more likely to fall or shift if not properly loaded and secured or are more difficult to safely dump or spread. Vehicles operated at this level are driven over rough terrain, in close quarters, and in heavy traffic on both long and short hauls. Some drivers at this grade level operate refueling vehicles (unitized tanker types) to refuel fixed and rotary wing aircraft. They drive these vehicles to and from aircraft refueling locations and fuel facilities using public roads and highways. They may pump fuel or assist other workers in the actual refueling of aircraft on the flight line or at other sites. They may install static lines for proper grounding of the aircraft and connect the hose to the aircraft fuel tank or assist attending personnel in such operations. These drivers comply with a checklist of safety procedures, and insure that the proper fire protection equipment is present. They complete such paper work as trip tickets and records indicating the amount and type of fuel dispensed and received. Some drivers at this grade level operate trash removal trucks with a rear end compactor plate to pick up and dispose of trash and refuse on a scheduled route both in a restricted installation environment and on public roads or under equivalent driving conditions. They may be required to back the vehicle into narrow spaces between buildings to collect trash. They may be assisted by laborers who collect the trash cans and empty their contents into the back of the truck. They drive the trash removal truck to the local dump site or incinerator facility, and operate the power takeoff device to empty the compressed trash from the body of the truck. Some drivers at this grade level operate a variety of passenger buses on scheduled or special runs from one location to another. Scheduled runs include work runs and shuttle runs, and special runs include touring trips to such locations as historic sites and recreation facilities. They are required to maneuver the bus around sharp corners and through narrow streets and roadways. Drivers at this grade level may also operate passenger ambulance buses which are equipped with litter facilities and other medical support equipment. These vehicles are driven with the same medical mission and driving conditions and requirements as described for ambulance or patient transport vehicle drivers at the grade 6 level, except that these drivers operate larger and longer vehicles and transport patients and their family members, and medical personnel. Skill and Knowledge: At this grade level, drivers know how to operate vehicles that are larger and longer than those driven at the lower grade levels; have heavier loads to secure and control; have air brakes and are more susceptible to sliding and tipping; and are difficult to maneuver, especially when turning and backing. Drivers have skill and knowledge to operate these vehicles over a variety of roads including interstate highways, narrow country roads, and on steep winding grades. Also, because of the size and weight of these vehicles, drivers are knowledgeable about which routes may be legally driven and the overpass clearances and other restrictions on such routes. The drivers of refueling vehicles know the operating procedures and regulations pertaining to driving vehicles in close proximity to aircraft. They have skill to maneuver the vehicles around parked aircraft and to back vehicles close to aircraft using hand signals from a spotter. They know the Federal, State, and installation safety regulations regarding the transportation of flammable liquids. They also know safety regulations regarding aircraft fueling operations, including hot operations where refueling is accomplished with the aircraft engines running and emergency shutdown procedures. The drivers of passenger buses have knowledge of safe braking distances because of the weight and size of the bus and the added weight of the passengers. They also know when mechanical or operational problems indicate that the bus is unsafe to drive and should be recovered by a tow vehicle. The drivers of vehicles equipped with special-purpose accessory equipment know how to operate power takeoff controls of equipment with more complex functions than the equipment at the grade 6 level. Also, this equipment has more intricate operating characteristics than equipment at the lower levels which makes its manipulation and control more difficult. For example, the driver may operate a large snow blower or very large snow plows such as rollover or v-blades for removing deep snow. Consequently, considerable judgment and experience are used to perform supplemental operations. Responsibility: Drivers receive instructions from the dispatcher or supervisor as to the type of vehicle to be operated, destination, cargo, passengers or patients to be transported, purpose of the trip, deadlines to be met, and any special information important to the mission. Additionally, some drivers determine the route to be followed, taking into consideration such factors as the clearance of underpasses, overhead power lines, weight limitations, highway restrictions, and alternate bypass routes. Other drivers who are assigned prescribed routes for such trips as work runs, shuttle runs, or medical transportation runs are responsible for knowing acceptable alternative routes for use in emergency situations which will legally accommodate the size and length of the vehicle being driven. Some grade 7 drivers are responsible for performing or overseeing the loading and unloading of bulky, cumbersome cargo and assuring that it is properly located, distributed, and secured in the vehicle for balance and stability. These drivers exercise more responsibility than the drivers at lower levels because the weight of the cargo and the size and type of vehicle driven increase the tendency of the entire cargo to shift and the vehicle to tip. Passenger buses or passenger ambulance buses are larger and longer and are able to carry more people than vehicles at the grade 6 level. Consequently, the driver must use expert judgement in making wide turns, braking, and backing and turning the bus around competently and safely. These drivers maneuver the buses in difficult traffic and in a variety of constricted locations while maintaining time schedules. Also, they insure that the buses do not contain more passengers than legally allowed. Drivers who operate special purpose accessory equipment are responsible for following a greater number of safety procedures and precautions than at the grade 6 level because the functions of the equipment are more complex. Drivers at the grade 7 level accomplish their assignments with considerable independence and are responsible for the safe operation of vehicles and equipment. Work is evaluated in terms of timeliness and driving competence. Physical Effort:  Drivers at this grade level exert light physical effort in reaching, bending, turning, or moving hands, arms, feet, and legs to operate hand and foot controls.  They exert moderate physical effort in the frequent handling of objects weighing up to 18 kilograms (40 pounds), and the occasional handling of heavier objects while loading cargo, with the assistance of other workers or weight handling equipment.  Drivers operate vehicles in all types of traffic and weather on public roads (or the equivalent), and are exposed to the danger of serious accidents.  They drive in heavy traffic and at highway speeds over complicated road and interchange systems. Greater physical effort is needed at this level to maneuver the longer and heavier vehicles, especially when backing these vehicles.  Ambulance or patient transport vehicle drivers may be required to assist patients into and out of the vehicle, which involves physical exertion and frequent stooping and bending Working Conditions:  Drivers work mostly outside and operate vehicles in all kinds of weather in a controlled traffic environment throughout a Government installation or establishment.  Drivers are exposed to dirt and fumes, and to the possibility of cuts, bruises, and broken bones as a result of accidents while driving or from falling objects when loading and unloading the vehicle.  Drivers operate vehicles in all types of traffic and weather on public roads (or the equivalent), and are exposed to the danger of serious accidents.  They drive in heavy traffic and at highway speeds over complicated road and interchange systems.    Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 12, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  Supply clerks and technicians perform work in a wide range of systematized supply operations, such as performing records functions in inventory, storage, cataloging, and receipt and control processes.  Employees typically do work associated with one of the supply management or operations processes.  Some employees, however, do work at local installations involving elements of several supply programs.  Supply clerks and technicians perform one o r more of the following kinds of work:  oversee stock maintenance at or within prescribed levels and establish or adjust stock levels and reorder points using standard formulae and prescribed procedures;  conduct physical inventories and adjust and/or maintain inventory, stock, plant, or property account records;  receive and screen lists or other documents specifying supplies or materials needed for planned programs or work operations, and collate and assemble lists of equipment and parts needed for acquisition plans; initiate, prepare, edit, and process requisitions to stock, commodity control, or other appropriate supply organizations; search catalogs, records, or other data sources to obtain or correct stock numbers or to find authorized substitutes for stock items; contact customers, supply organizations, transportation units, and others to obtain material status information, follow up on urgently required items, and/or expedite delivery of material to work sites; process documentation for stock item receipts, maintain such items in a supply room or similar storage area, issue material to shop or work center personnel, keep local stock records, reorder when stocks are low or at a specified reorder point, prepare standard reports such as variances between actual and estimated costs, and perform related stock receipt, storage, control, and issue functions for expendable and non-expendable items for a local organization; identify requirements and requisition, issue, or distribute office and administrative supplies, forms, publications, or other printed materials; maintain an accurate accounting and reporting system for non-expendable property and perform standardized property management control processes; and/or operate computer terminals or personal computers to perform records search, data input, and data corrections. A supply "item" as used in this standard is a generic term. It may refer to supplies, equipment, material, property (except real property), publications, and certain related services. Scope or size of the organization served does not itself influence the grade level of Supply Clerk or Technician positions. They operate in any kind of organizational entity, at any level. They may be found, for example, in an operating office serving the consumer, in an agency headquarters supply office, in the supply office of a local field establishment, or in a system-wide national inventory control point. Virtually all supply systems are automated. Supply clerks and technicians must have sufficient knowledge of the automated systems to apply instructions for supply actions such as data entry, reports retrieval, error correction, and searching for specific records. The work is performed through terminal stations and/or personal computers. Employees maintain specified sets of records in general supply operations or in support of one of the specialized supply functions (i.e., inventory, cataloging, etc.) and are responsible for keeping them both accurate and current.  Click here for additional information related to skills requirements & experiences   Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 09, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  General: The work at the grade 10 level involves determining the cause of malfunctions and making repairs to a variety of heavy mobile equipment and vehicles, such as bulldozers, road graders, rollers, and similar heavy construction and earth moving vehicles; front-end loaders, backhoes, and similar power shovels; mobile cranes; heavy combat equipment; and heavy special purpose vehicles such as large runway snow removal vehicles, missile transporters, fire engine and pump trucks, ladder trucks, and similar equipment which have mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, and electric systems, controls, or features not commonly found on automobiles and ordinary transport trucks and buses. In comparison with grade 8 heavy mobile equipment repairers who replace or adjust parts in accordance with oral instructions or work orders, grade 10 level mechanics have a greater knowledge of how the various mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, electrical, electronic, and fuel systems work together. They have greater skill than grade 8 level workers in using a wider variety of test procedures and equipment in tracing hardto-locate problems, and they complete major repairs, overhauls, and modifications with little or no technical advice. They conduct functional and performance tests on completed work assignments. The work may involve one of the following kinds of assignments: Troubleshooting and repairing the full range of systems on the vehicles or equipment;  Overhauling one type of major system, such as engines or transmissions, on a wide range of vehicles and equipment of the kind described above; or  Repairing one type of major system on one of the vehicles described at the next higher level, such as crossdrive transmissions. Skill and Knowledge:  In order to diagnose, repair, overhaul, and modify heavy mobile equipment, systems, and vehicles, grade 10 level mechanics have a thorough knowledge of the mechanical makeup, operation, and working relationships of heavy duty systems, assemblies, and parts, including such major systems as diesel, multifuel, and gasoline engines, including supercharged and turbocharged engines; turbine engines; automatic and manual transmissions and gear reduction systems, including those with torque converters, planetary gears, and power take offs; drive line assemblies including differentials, power dividers, and dual speed axles; electrical and electronic systems and accessories, including ignition systems, charging and starting systems, and wiring and lighting systems; carbureted and fuel injection systems; and emission control systems.  Mechanics at this level are knowledgeable of electrical, electronic, hydraulic, pneumatic, and other nonmechanical systems which have a functional relationship and effect on the operation of mechanical systems.  They have a thorough knowledge of hydraulic lifting, loading, turning, and positioning systems and their mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, electrical, and electronic controls.  They have a basic knowledge of electronics sufficient to identify and replace defective components, such as sensors, diodes, and circuit boards, and they refer more complex problems to electronics mechanics. Physical Effort: Heavy mobile equipment repairers at the grade 8 level work in tiring or uncomfortable positions for long periods.  The work requires frequent standing, bending, reaching, stretching, climbing, and crouching.  They work on top of, under, and in tight compartments of vehicles in cramped or awkward positions.  They perform strenuous work while standing, lying, or sitting.  They frequently lift and carry items, unassisted, weighing up to 18 kilograms (40 pounds), and often exert similar effort in pushing, pulling, and positioning parts, assemblies, and equipment.  They frequently lift and move heavier items with the assistance of other workers or with lifting devices such as jacks, hoists, and cranes.  They are sometimes required to work from ladders or work platforms at varying heights. Working Conditions: Heavy mobile equipment repairers at the grade 8 level work both inside and outside.   When inside, they are frequently exposed to drafts, changing temperatures, and noise which is difficult to talk above.  When outside, they sometimes work in bad weather, in mud or snow, and in wet or icy areas.  Both inside and outside, workers are exposed to irritations and discomfort from dust, grease, heat, and fumes.  They typically work on parts and systems which are dirty, oily, or greasy.  They are subject to cuts, burns, chemical irritations, bruises, electrical shock, and injuries from falls while repairing, positioning, and moving equipment.  They follow prescribed safety practices and use safety equipment such as protective ear devices, hard hats, hard-toe shoes, gloves, respirators, and protective clothing.  Some of these safety items may be uncomfortable to wear or use, and may be worn or used for long periods.    Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 09, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  General:  The work at this grade level involves making repairs that can be accomplished by removing, adjusting, or replacing defective or worn parts and components; or assisting higher level heavy mobile equipment mechanics in disassembling, repairing, and assembling major systems, components, and operating mechanisms.  For example, grade 8 heavy mobile equipment repairers replace seals and shaft sealing rings, horns, wiring harnesses, starting switches, ignition distributors, sensors, fuel pumps, and water pumps; adjust voltage and current control units, engine idle, brakes, and transmission linkages; and clean or replace filters, battery cables, engine components, and injector nozzles.  They assist heavy mobile equipment mechanics in the complete overhaul and repair of major systems, such as engines, transmissions, drive lines, and hydraulic utility systems. Skill and Knowledge: At this grade level, heavy mobile equipment repairers must have a working knowledge of various techniques for removing, adjusting, replacing, cleaning, and installing a variety of parts, components, and accessories such as filters, radiators, bearings, springs, shock absorbers, wheel cylinders, starter motors, mufflers, and other items of similar complexity.  They are able to determine when parts should be cleaned and adjusted, or replaced with standard parts.  They have a basic understanding of mechanical, electrical, and hydraulic theory applying to heavy duty vehicles; and skill to replace, fit, install, and make adjustments, such as performing engine tuneups, timing distributors, and adjusting brakes.  They are able to use basic tools common to the occupation (e.g., wrenches, sockets, torque wrenches, brake tools, and screwdrivers) and a small variety of test and measurement devices (e.g., feeler gauges, depth gauges, circuit testers, micrometers, and dial indicators).  They have an understanding of the makeup and operation of the various individual systems maintained and their interrelationships.  They can analyze test results in order to locate improperly functioning parts for repair or replacement.  They are able to read and interpret parts lists, manufacturers' repair manuals, diagrams, and electrical schematics.  Responsibility: A higher-grade worker or supervisor assigns work orally or through work orders, indicating the nature of the problem. On new assignments or complex repairs involving portions of major assemblies or systems, such as engines or transmissions, the supervisor provides instruction and demonstrates the techniques, methods, and procedures to be followed. On routine assignments, heavy mobile equipment repairers perform work independently, selecting tools, deciding on techniques to use, and carrying out assignments with minimal review during progress. They obtain standard parts, such as water pumps, tailpipes, thermostats, batteries, brake shoes, and shock absorbers, by looking up replacement information in parts manuals or by making comparison with samples. They make adjustments and settings in accordance with specifications in manufacturers' manuals, and test the completed product. Completed work is subject to functional tests and final inspection for quality of workmanship and compliance with accepted trade practices, technical manuals, specifications, and instructions. Physical Effort: Heavy mobile equipment repairers at the grade 8 level work in tiring or uncomfortable positions for long periods.  The work requires frequent standing, bending, reaching, stretching, climbing, and crouching.  They work on top of, under, and in tight compartments of vehicles in cramped or awkward positions.  They perform strenuous work while standing, lying, or sitting.  They frequently lift and carry items, unassisted, weighing up to 18 kilograms (40 pounds), and often exert similar effort in pushing, pulling, and positioning parts, assemblies, and equipment.  They frequently lift and move heavier items with the assistance of other workers or with lifting devices such as jacks, hoists, and cranes.  They are sometimes required to work from ladders or work platforms at varying heights. Working Conditions: Heavy mobile equipment repairers at the grade 8 level work both inside and outside.   When inside, they are frequently exposed to drafts, changing temperatures, and noise which is difficult to talk above.  When outside, they sometimes work in bad weather, in mud or snow, and in wet or icy areas.  Both inside and outside, workers are exposed to irritations and discomfort from dust, grease, heat, and fumes.  They typically work on parts and systems which are dirty, oily, or greasy.  They are subject to cuts, burns, chemical irritations, bruises, electrical shock, and injuries from falls while repairing, positioning, and moving equipment.  They follow prescribed safety practices and use safety equipment such as protective ear devices, hard hats, hard-toe shoes, gloves, respirators, and protective clothing.  Some of these safety items may be uncomfortable to wear or use, and may be worn or used for long periods.    Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office MCRD, Pacific Highway, San Diego, CA, USA
Feb 09, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)***  General: Unlike grade 4 materials handlers, grade 5 materials handlers usually work independently in a wide range of warehousing activities, including receiving, storing, selecting, and shipping general or specialized bulk and bin materials and equipment. Using a broad general knowledge or warehouse plans and procedures, grade 5 materials handlers are able to independently load and unload materials check, assemble, and process documents, and route materials and equipment to correct locations or storage areas. They also locate, access, load and move material for shipment and verify or prepare documents either manually or by using automated equipment such as computer terminals and bar code wands to read, store, track, and prepare materials documentation. Grade 5 materials handlers prepare shipping and inventory documents with required data for manual or automated inventory systems. In some work situations, they load and unload shipments from trucks, rail cars, and other material conveyances using fork lifts, manual and mechanized pallet jacks, side loaders, stacker cranes, and automated guided vehicles in mechanized warehouses. When operating automated storage vehicles they may use remote terminals and keyboards to receive and transmit "pick and stow" data into a central computer. They may operate warehouse tractors, fork lifts, tugs and trucks, and other general purpose vehicles and perform routine operator maintenance. Materials handlers at the grade 5 level may work in hazardous materials storage areas requiring them to learn and follow specialized handling and storage procedures as required by regulatory and safety requirements. Skill and Knowledge: In contrast to grade 4 materials handlers who perform routine and repetitive tasks, grade 5 materials handlers are assigned a wide variety and range of duties requiring more specialized knowledge of warehouse plan, methods, procedures, and techniques of material handling. They are able to operate mechanized equipment including utility vehicles, standard size fork lifts, mobile stock selectors, and electromechanical automated equipment, such as high rise automated storage and retrieval vehicles, which use remote computer terminals to receive and transmit storage, inventory, and requisition data in automated warehouses. In both automated and non-automated warehouses they are able to process and independently complete shipping and receiving documents to insure correctness of quantities, identification criteria, and labeling. They may use automated equipment such as optical readers and scanners (bar code wands) and computer keyboards to develop computerized inventory data, access materials, and fill item requisitions. They are skilled in stacking, moving, and arranging items on pallets and must consider height, weight, and special handling requirements. They are able to use pallet measuring gauges and automated devices to insure that proper height, weight, and other load and storage requirements are met and damage in storage or in transit is prevented. Grade 5 materials handlers in mechanized warehouses have a good working knowledge of the manned and unmanned electromechanical devices and systems used such as multipack induction conveyors and robotic pallet manipulators. When regularly working with or assigned to the specialized handling of hazardous materials, grade 5 materials handlers must have knowledge and skills required for the safe handling, storage and movement of materials handled. This is usually acquired through formal training courses as well as on-the-job training to insure that all regulatory and safety requirements are met.  Responsibility: At the grade 5 level materials handlers are responsible for document processing and verification of the quantity and condition of materials and equipment handled. Unlike material handlers at the grade 4 level who work on repetitive tasks or under close supervision, grade 5 material handlers receive general instructions from a supervisor. Assignments are usually completed without guidance on methods, procedures, or techniques, and work is reviewed for compliance with general guidelines and results achieved. Grade 5 materials handlers follow established methods and procedures, and work is spot-checked upon completion for accuracy, adherence to procedural requirements, thoroughness, and results. Grade 5 materials handlers may be responsible for operating mechanized and electromechanical systems such as fork lift trucks, tugs, manned storage and retrieval vehicles, and highrise platform lifts which may operate in narrow and constricted warehouses aisles. They observe all safety procedures required when working near mechanized towveyers, powered conveyor systems, and other mechanized equipment. Grade 5 materials handlers, whether using manual or computerized equipment, are responsible for the processing of documents or data handled. They work independently using computer terminals, keyboards, and optical scanners to develop coding data or with traditional printed shipping and receiving documents, making written entries and verifying data in printed formats. Physical Effort:  Grade 5 materials handlers are often required to stand on hard surfaces for extended periods of time, and to bend, stoop, and work in tiring and sometimes uncomfortable positions.  They may lift and carry items that weigh up to 8 kilograms (40 pounds).  The heavier items are moved with weight handling equipment or with assistance from other workers.  Working Conditions: At the grade 5 level, work is done inside or outside in areas that may be hot, damp, cold, drafty, or poorly lighted. Materials handlers are regularly exposed to the possibility of cuts, scrapers, bruises, abrasions, falls, and injury from falling stock or mechanized work areas. When working in hazardous materials areas, they may be subject to exposure from radiation, toxins, explosive hazards, or chemical fumes. Work may require wearing protective clothing such as hardhats, steel toed shoes, rubber gloves, masks, and rubber aprons.    Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Miramar, San Diego, CA, USA
Feb 09, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST  qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)*** General:  Unlike grade 5 level materials handlers, who at one time or another may perform a full range of warehousing duties, materials handlers at the grade 6 level usually handle or oversee one or more product lines, a segment of a large warehouse, or serve as the senior employee in a smaller warehouse or supply facility.  They may assist the supervisor in developing plans for storage and arrangement of stock in accordance with agency regulations which determine the configuration setup, movement, rearrangement and traffic flow.  Grade 6 materials handlers in larger warehouse facilities typically have responsibility for a storage and space utilization in accordance with agency regulations for a specific commodity or equipment group such as general supplies, construction materials, medical supplies, high value items, or electronic systems, and usually work on their own initiative to consolidate materials, and provide maximum space utilization and protection of materials.  In hazardous materials storage areas, they insure the safe receipt, storage and movement of hazardous and toxic materials and substances such as certain types of ammunition, explosives, chemicals, or radioactive materials in accordance with facility and regulatory requirements.  In smaller warehouse facilities, grade 6 materials handlers may serve as the senior nonsupervisory worker of the facility, laying out storage space, establishing item locations, determining organization and arrangement of stock, and identifying high and low usage items according to agency regulations and procedures.  Typically, this encompasses a full spectrum of warehouse functions.  Grade 6 materials handlers may serve as a senior member of a warehouse project team of materials handlers involved in a special project such as warehouse conversion from manual to automated systems, relocating a major commodity or equipment group, or setting up a new commodity group area.  In addition to the equipment operating functions performed at the grade 5 level, grade 6 materials handlers may operate large warehouse perimeter vehicles such as cargo trucks, stake trucks, and jumbo tugs.  They may also functionally coordinate incoming and outgoing shipments and placement of materials with docking area and scheduling personnel to facilitate movement of materials in accordance with priorities, scheduling requirements, and space allocations. Skill and Knowledge: Unlike grade 5 materials handlers who generally work under established guidelines and instructions requiring general knowledge of warehouse functions, grade 6 materials handlers must have an in-depth knowledge of the overall warehousing plan, documentation requirements, and accepted warehousing methods, procedures, and techniques. As senior workers, they often work independently and may be assigned functional responsibilities for a major commodity segment or equipment group in a larger warehouse, or may serve as the primary materials handler in a small warehouse such as a base or post supply facility. They are able to lay out storage space and establish item and material locations in accordance with agency regulations. Grade 6 materials handlers are able to prepare inventory and production reports, screen and identify shipping and receiving documents for discrepancies, and direct shipments to shipping or storage areas. They have a thorough knowledge of the physical distribution functions of a warehouse such as material receiving, storage, issuing, and preservation. Grade 6 materials handlers determine sequences for loading materials and organize incoming shipments for maximum space utilization, safety considerations, and damage protection. They are skilled in the use of onsite automated equipment and systems. They are able to operate the larger material moving equipment and vehicles inside the warehouse and fork lifts and related vehicles in outside holding areas on unpaved, unimproved, or difficult terrain.  Grade 6 materials handlers who work in hazardous materials areas have knowledge of specialized hazardous handling, storing, and safety procedures gained through formal course study and on-the-job training to insure adherence to governing regulatory procedures and policies. They are able independently to place, store, maintain, and oversee certain types of hazardous materials such as toxic chemicals, pesticides, flammables, and some explosives, ammunition, and radioactive materials in accordance with regulatory and other safety requirements. Responsibility:  Materials handlers at the grade 6 level are generally responsible for performing a full range of warehouse functions in either a major segment of a large warehouse or as the principal materials handler in a small warehouse.  Their responsibilities include receiving, locating, storing, shipping, and re-warehousing materials, commodities, or equipment in accordance with established procedures and operating requirements.  Unlike the grade 5 materials handlers, they generally work with a high degree of independence in determining sequences of loading and unloading, developing space utilization plans, and implementing the movement of materials from dock to bin or from storage to shipping.  In mechanized warehouse they may provide guidance to lower level workers in the operation of specialized equipment such as manned storage and retrieval cranes, automated stock selectors, multipack induction conveyors, and other automated or mechanized equipment. They also provide guidance to lower level workers in accessing and using remote computer terminals and equipment to verify inventory levels, fill orders, place stock, and develop the necessary computerized documentation. In nonautomated warehouses they are responsible for effectively accomplishing all types of warehouse functions as assigned. They are often responsible for directing and guiding the work of lower level workers as well as making determinations as to placement, unloading, timing, and general movement of materials within assigned areas. Grade 6 materials handlers work under the general direction of a supervisor or facility supervisor. In smaller warehouse and storage facilities grade 6 materials handlers may have responsibility for the movement of the stock as well as the maintenance of stock level inventories. In larger warehouse stock such as hazardous materials, high value items, an equipment or commodity group, or surplus materials areas, insuring appropriate adherence to established documentation, safety, material movement, and preservation procedures and requirements.  Assignments may include responsibility for the re-warehousing of a large storage area, maintaining and arranging storage areas in accordance with warehouse plans and safety procedures, and the automated equipment and warehouse material movement vehicles. Grade 6 materials handlers may recommend the sequence of warehouse functions for an assigned area such as the order of receiving, shipping, and issuing, based on general guidelines and knowledge of material movement priorities and procedures.  Review of work is based on results achieved including the meeting of schedules and priorities, accuracy of stock balances, orderliness of storage areas, adherence to general warehouse plans, and customer service effectiveness.  Physical Effort:  Grade 6 materials handlers are often required to stand on hard surfaces for extended periods of time, and to bend, stoop, and work in tiring and sometimes uncomfortable positions.  They may lift and carry items that weigh up to 8 kilograms (40 pounds).  The heavier items are moved with weight handling equipment or with assistance from other workers.  Working Conditions: At the grade 6 level, work is done inside or outside in areas that may be hot, damp, cold, drafty, or poorly lighted. Materials handlers are regularly exposed to the possibility of cuts, scrapers, bruises, abrasions, falls, and injury from falling stock or mechanized work areas. When working in hazardous materials areas, they may be subject to exposure from radiation, toxins, explosive hazards, or chemical fumes. Work may require wearing protective clothing such as hardhats, steel toed shoes, rubber gloves, masks, and rubber aprons.  Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 09, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)*** General:  Unlike grade 5 level materials handlers, who at one time or another may perform a full range of warehousing duties, materials handlers at the grade 6 level usually handle or oversee one or more product lines, a segment of a large warehouse, or serve as the senior employee in a smaller warehouse or supply facility.  They may assist the supervisor in developing plans for storage and arrangement of stock in accordance with agency regulations which determine the configuration setup, movement, rearrangement and traffic flow.  Grade 6 materials handlers in larger warehouse facilities typically have responsibility for a storage and space utilization in accordance with agency regulations for a specific commodity or equipment group such as general supplies, construction materials, medical supplies, high value items, or electronic systems, and usually work on their own initiative to consolidate materials, and provide maximum space utilization and protection of materials.  In hazardous materials storage areas, they insure the safe receipt, storage and movement of hazardous and toxic materials and substances such as certain types of ammunition, explosives, chemicals, or radioactive materials in accordance with facility and regulatory requirements.  In smaller warehouse facilities, grade 6 materials handlers may serve as the senior nonsupervisory worker of the facility, laying out storage space, establishing item locations, determining organization and arrangement of stock, and identifying high and low usage items according to agency regulations and procedures.  Typically, this encompasses a full spectrum of warehouse functions.  Grade 6 materials handlers may serve as a senior member of a warehouse project team of materials handlers involved in a special project such as warehouse conversion from manual to automated systems, relocating a major commodity or equipment group, or setting up a new commodity group area.  In addition to the equipment operating functions performed at the grade 5 level, grade 6 materials handlers may operate large warehouse perimeter vehicles such as cargo trucks, stake trucks, and jumbo tugs.  They may also functionally coordinate incoming and outgoing shipments and placement of materials with docking area and scheduling personnel to facilitate movement of materials in accordance with priorities, scheduling requirements, and space allocations. Skill and Knowledge: Unlike grade 5 materials handlers who generally work under established guidelines and instructions requiring general knowledge of warehouse functions, grade 6 materials handlers must have an in-depth knowledge of the overall warehousing plan, documentation requirements, and accepted warehousing methods, procedures, and techniques. As senior workers, they often work independently and may be assigned functional responsibilities for a major commodity segment or equipment group in a larger warehouse, or may serve as the primary materials handler in a small warehouse such as a base or post supply facility. They are able to lay out storage space and establish item and material locations in accordance with agency regulations. Grade 6 materials handlers are able to prepare inventory and production reports, screen and identify shipping and receiving documents for discrepancies, and direct shipments to shipping or storage areas. They have a thorough knowledge of the physical distribution functions of a warehouse such as material receiving, storage, issuing, and preservation. Grade 6 materials handlers determine sequences for loading materials and organize incoming shipments for maximum space utilization, safety considerations, and damage protection. They are skilled in the use of onsite automated equipment and systems. They are able to operate the larger material moving equipment and vehicles inside the warehouse and fork lifts and related vehicles in outside holding areas on unpaved, unimproved, or difficult terrain. Grade 6 materials handlers who work in hazardous materials areas have knowledge of specialized hazardous handling, storing, and safety procedures gained through formal course study and on-the-job training to insure adherence to governing regulatory procedures and policies. They are able independently to place, store, maintain, and oversee certain types of hazardous materials such as toxic chemicals, pesticides, flammables, and some explosives, ammunition, and radioactive materials in accordance with regulatory and other safety requirements. Responsibility:  Materials handlers at the grade 6 level are generally responsible for performing a full range of warehouse functions in either a major segment of a large warehouse or as the principal materials handler in a small warehouse.  Their responsibilities include receiving, locating, storing, shipping, and re-warehousing materials, commodities, or equipment in accordance with established procedures and operating requirements.  Unlike the grade 5 materials handlers, they generally work with a high degree of independence in determining sequences of loading and unloading, developing space utilization plans, and implementing the movement of materials from dock to bin or from storage to shipping.  In mechanized warehouse they may provide guidance to lower level workers in the operation of specialized equipment such as manned storage and retrieval cranes, automated stock selectors, multipack induction conveyors, and other automated or mechanized equipment. They also provide guidance to lower level workers in accessing and using remote computer terminals and equipment to verify inventory levels, fill orders, place stock, and develop the necessary computerized documentation. In nonautomated warehouses they are responsible for effectively accomplishing all types of warehouse functions as assigned. They are often responsible for directing and guiding the work of lower level workers as well as making determinations as to placement, unloading, timing, and general movement of materials within assigned areas. Grade 6 materials handlers work under the general direction of a supervisor or facility supervisor. In smaller warehouse and storage facilities grade 6 materials handlers may have responsibility for the movement of the stock as well as the maintenance of stock level inventories. In larger warehouse stock such as hazardous materials, high value items, an equipment or commodity group, or surplus materials areas, insuring appropriate adherence to established documentation, safety, material movement, and preservation procedures and requirements. Assignments may include responsibility for the re-warehousing of a large storage area, maintaining and arranging storage areas in accordance with warehouse plans and safety procedures, and the automated equipment and warehouse material movement vehicles. Grade 6 materials handlers may recommend the sequence of warehouse functions for an assigned area such as the order of receiving, shipping, and issuing, based on general guidelines and knowledge of material movement priorities and procedures. Review of work is based on results achieved including the meeting of schedules and priorities, accuracy of stock balances, orderliness of storage areas, adherence to general warehouse plans, and customer service effectiveness.  Physical Effort:  Grade 6 materials handlers are often required to stand on hard surfaces for extended periods of time, and to bend, stoop, and work in tiring and sometimes uncomfortable positions.  They may lift and carry items that weigh up to 8 kilograms (40 pounds).  The heavier items are moved with weight handling equipment or with assistance from other workers.  Working Conditions: At the grade 6 level, work is done inside or outside in areas that may be hot, damp, cold, drafty, or poorly lighted. Materials handlers are regularly exposed to the possibility of cuts, scrapers, bruises, abrasions, falls, and injury from falling stock or mechanized work areas. When working in hazardous materials areas, they may be subject to exposure from radiation, toxins, explosive hazards, or chemical fumes. Work may require wearing protective clothing such as hardhats, steel toed shoes, rubber gloves, masks, and rubber aprons. Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office MCRD, Pacific Highway, San Diego, CA, USA
Feb 09, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)*** The following table shows the amounts of education and/or experience required to qualify for positions covered by this standard. Equivalent combinations of experience and education are qualifying for grade levels for which both education and experience are acceptable. Experience General Experience (for positions at GS-4 and below):  Qualifying general experience includes experience in administrative, clerical, technical, or military work that involved protecting property, equipment, data, or materials; or that involved making judgments based on the application of directions, rules, regulations, or laws. Specialized Experience (for positions at GS-4 and above):  Experience that provided knowledge of a body of basic laws and regulations, law enforcement operations, practices, and techniques and involved responsibility for maintaining order and protecting life and property. Creditable specialized experience may have been gained in work on a police force; through service as a military police officer; in work providing visitor protection and law enforcement in parks, forests, or other natural resource or recreational environments; in performing criminal investigative duties; or in other work that provided the required knowledge and skills. OR Education/Training Successful completion of a Federal, State, county, or municipal police academy or comparable training course that included at least 40 classroom hours of instruction in police department procedures and methods, and local law and regulations, may be substituted for a maximum of 3 months of specialized experience or 6 months of general experience. No substitution of education or training may be made for the required specialized experience at GS-6 and above. Test Requirements Refer to Section V of this Manual for information about test requirements. Investigation of Fitness A character investigation may be conducted on applicants selected for employment. The purpose of such an investigation is to secure evidence of the candidate's honesty, integrity, general character, and loyalty to the U.S. Government. Such investigations will be conducted under the security requirements of the hiring agency. Medical Requirements The duties of these positions require moderate to arduous physical exertion and/or duties of a hazardous nature. The following medical requirements apply to all applicants: good near and distant vision, ability to distinguish basic colors, and ability to hear the conversational voice. Agencies may establish additional, job-related physical or medical requirements provided that the specific position(s) involves the arduous or hazardous duties to which the physical requirements relate. Applicants and employees must have the capacity to perform the essential functions of the position without risk to themselves or others. Applicants and employees must possess emotional and mental stability. In most instances, a specific medical condition or impairment will not automatically disqualify an applicant or employee. A medical condition or impairment is disqualifying only if the condition, for good medical reason, precludes assignment to or warrants restriction from the duties of the specific position. For some positions, the loss or impairment of a specific function may be compensated for by the satisfactory use of a prosthesis or mechanical aid. Reasonable accommodation shall also be considered in determining an applicant's ability to perform the duties of a position. Reasonable accommodation may include, but is not limited to the use of assistive devices, job modification or restructuring, provision of readers and interpreters, or adjusted work schedules. All positions involving Federal motor vehicle operation carry the additional medical requirements specified in 5 CFR 930 and the "General Policies and Instructions" section of this Manual.   Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 09, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates  MUST   qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)*** The following table shows the amounts of education and/or experience required to qualify for positions covered by this standard. Equivalent combinations of experience and education are qualifying for grade levels for which both education and experience are acceptable. Experience General Experience (for positions at GS-4 and below): Qualifying general experience includes experience in administrative, clerical, technical, or military work that involved protecting property, equipment, data, or materials; or that involved making judgments based on the application of directions, rules, regulations, or laws. Specialized Experience (for positions at GS-4 and above): Experience that provided knowledge of a body of basic laws and regulations, law enforcement operations, practices, and techniques and involved responsibility for maintaining order and protecting life and property. Creditable specialized experience may have been gained in work on a police force; through service as a military police officer; in work providing visitor protection and law enforcement in parks, forests, or other natural resource or recreational environments; in performing criminal investigative duties; or in other work that provided the required knowledge and skills. OR Education/Training Successful completion of a Federal, State, county, or municipal police academy or comparable training course that included at least 40 classroom hours of instruction in police department procedures and methods, and local law and regulations, may be substituted for a maximum of 3 months of specialized experience or 6 months of general experience. No substitution of education or training may be made for the required specialized experience at GS-6 and above. Test Requirements Refer to Section V of this Manual for information about test requirements. Investigation of Fitness A character investigation may be conducted on applicants selected for employment. The purpose of such an investigation is to secure evidence of the candidate's honesty, integrity, general character, and loyalty to the U.S. Government. Such investigations will be conducted under the security requirements of the hiring agency. Medical Requirements The duties of these positions require moderate to arduous physical exertion and/or duties of a hazardous nature. The following medical requirements apply to all applicants: good near and distant vision, ability to distinguish basic colors, and ability to hear the conversational voice. Agencies may establish additional, job-related physical or medical requirements provided that the specific position(s) involves the arduous or hazardous duties to which the physical requirements relate. Applicants and employees must have the capacity to perform the essential functions of the position without risk to themselves or others. Applicants and employees must possess emotional and mental stability. In most instances, a specific medical condition or impairment will not automatically disqualify an applicant or employee. A medical condition or impairment is disqualifying only if the condition, for good medical reason, precludes assignment to or warrants restriction from the duties of the specific position. For some positions, the loss or impairment of a specific function may be compensated for by the satisfactory use of a prosthesis or mechanical aid. Reasonable accommodation shall also be considered in determining an applicant's ability to perform the duties of a position. Reasonable accommodation may include, but is not limited to the use of assistive devices, job modification or restructuring, provision of readers and interpreters, or adjusted work schedules. All positions involving Federal motor vehicle operation carry the additional medical requirements specified in 5 CFR 930 and the "General Policies and Instructions" section of this Manual.   Lloyd Songne Team D
Marine Corps Base Human Resources Office Camp Pendleton Main Gate, Vandegrift Boulevard, Oceanside, CA, USA
Feb 09, 2018
Full time
***These are Civil Service positions and all candidates MUST qualify for non-competitive selection status under Veterans Recruitment Appointment ( VRA requirements ) or Service-Connected Disabled Veteran (SCDV)*** General: The work at this grade involves making repairs that can be accomplished by removing, replacing, adjusting, or cleaning defective parts or components. For example, grade 8 automotive workers replace sensors, water pumps, spark plugs, brakeshoes, mufflers, radiator caps, condensers, engine gaskets, a variety of belts and hoses, and complete assemblies such as removing old engines and replacing them with new engines. They adjust brakes, transmission linkages, engine idle, voltage and current control valves, sensing valves, expansion valves, and pressure regulator valves. They clean or replace filters, screens, battery cables and clamps, engine components, and heating and cooling devices. In addition, they service and check air conditioning systems including purging and recharging systems, flush radiators and replace antifreeze solutions, and align front ends of cars and trucks by adjusting caster, camber, and setting toe-in. Automotive workers at grade 8 receive work orders or oral instructions that indicate the nature of the repair or installation to be made. They locate worn or poorly adjusted parts through visual and auditory checks, and through the use of a small variety of test equipment such as test lamps, timing lights, multimeters, tachometers, and dwell meters. They also use vehicle on-board computers to help diagnose problems, and electronic analyzers to test automotive computer control systems and emission systems. Skill and Knowledge: At this grade, automotive workers must have a knowledge of various techniques for removing, replacing, cleaning, and installing a variety of parts, components, and accessories such as filters, radiators, engine thermostats, wheel cylinders, universal joints, wheel bearings, springs, shock absorbers, mufflers, components of heating and air conditioning systems, brake components, catalytic converters, clutch assemblies, carburetors, and suspension components such as lower control arms, struts, constant velocity joints (CV Joints), and stabilizer arms. They must have the ability to determine when parts should be cleaned and reinstalled or replaced with standard parts. They must have a basic understanding of electricity and hydraulics, and the skill needed to make adjustments and settings, such as performing engine tune-ups, setting engine timing according to specifications, and adjusting brakes and power steering mechanisms. They must have a basic understanding of on-board computer diagnostic systems and other test equipment, and the ability to test automotive computer control systems and emission systems. They must be skilled in using basic tools common to the occupation (e.g., wrenches, sockets, ratchets, impact wrenches, torque wrenches, pliers, brake tools, and screwdrivers); in operating equipment common to the trade (e.g., front-end alignment and wheel balancing equipment, turning and grinding equipment for servicing brake drums and discs or rotor assemblies, and drilling and pressure bleeding devices); and in operating a small variety of test equipment (e.g., engine analyzers, capacity testers to determine if batteries are discharging or need replacement, hand-held computer diagnostic equipment, circuit testers, micrometers and dial indicators, tachometers, dwell meters, and battery hydrometers). They must have a basic understanding of the makeup and operation of the various individual systems and their interrelationships to analyze test results in order to locate improperly functioning parts for repair or replacement. They must have the ability to read and interpret parts manuals and manufacturers' repair manuals. Responsibility: A higher grade worker or supervisor assigns work orally or through work orders, indicating the nature of the problem. Automotive workers at this level select tools, decide on the techniques to use, and carry out assignments with minimal check during progress. They obtain standard parts, such as water pumps, wheel bearings, fan clutches, brake linings, tailpipes, thermostats, master cylinders, windshield wiper motors, starters, alternators, batteries, drive line components, and other components of similar complexity by looking up replacement information in parts manuals or by making comparison with samples. They make adjustments and settings in accordance with specifications in manufacturers' manuals and test the completed product. Routine repair and maintenance duties are accomplished independently. A supervisor or higher graded worker provides assistance when standard procedures fail to correct the problem or when the automotive worker is assigned more complex repairs involving major assemblies or systems, such as engines, transmissions, differentials, or electronically controlled components. Completed work is checked for compliance with instructions, specifications, and standard shop practices. Physical Effort: Automotive workers at this level make repairs which often require them to work in tiring, awkward, and uncomfortable positions. They frequently stand for long periods of time, bend, stoop, crawl under vehicles, and make repairs in other tight spaces. They frequently lift, handle, and carry parts and equipment weighing up to 18 kilograms (40 pounds). Occasionally, they move moderately heavy items with assistance or with mechanical devices, including objects weighing up to or over 23 kilograms (50 pounds). Working Conditions: The work is usually performed inside on concrete surfaces where there is exposure to drafts, noise, and fumes from vehicles. Automotive workers occasionally perform work outside under adverse weather conditions. They are continually exposed to dirt, dust, and grease, and to the potential for burns, chemical irritations, shocks, bruises, cuts, and strains. To reduce dangers and irritations from these conditions, they follow prescribed safety practices and use safety equipment such as safety shoes and glasses, and respirators.   Lloyd Songne Team D